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Unicef’s 1000 days campaign

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

We’ve all just watched Unicef’s moving animation explaining in devastating fashion why the first 1000 days of a child’s life are critical.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZBJTYy2SIk&feature=youtu.be

A critical message here is that breastfed babies in developing countries are more likely to survive.

FROM http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_breastfeeding.html

It was estimated that reaching over 90 per cent of infants with a package of interventions to protect, promote and support optimal infant and young child feeding practices can contribute to reducing overall child mortality by close to one fifth. Optimal breastfeeding practices, especially exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months of age, has the single greatest potential impact on child survival, with the potential to prevent 1.4 million under-5 deaths in the developing world (Lancet 2008). A further 6 per cent or close six hundred thousand under five deaths can be prevented by ensuring optimal complementary feeding (Lancet 2003).

And yet, THIS

BFrates

 

 

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Can science end starvation?

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

On Saturday the 8th June 2013, the government is hosting a “hunger summit”, ahead of a massive family rally in Hyde Park later in the day.

THE BIG IF will feature a host of household names and celebrities and aims to draw attention to world hunger ahead of the G8 summit

“Everyone at the Big IF London rally will help create a huge visual petition to demonstrate the scale of public support for the IF campaign. The petition will be made up of 250,000 spinning flowers, with a total of two million petals representing the two million children who die because of hunger each year – lives that can be saved if world leaders take action at the G8.”

 

Malnutrition hurts people and countries. Today’s event addresses if and how we can use science and business to stop hunger.2010hungry_people

 

 

OTHER BLOG POSTS PUBLISHED DURING THIS EVENT

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg

 

 


Mark Walport – Chief Scientist

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

Mark Walport speaks:

SCIENCE SECURITY SAFETY

The role of science. Plant and animal diseases are a massive factor in undernutrition.

There is a disease that currently affects 37% of the global wheat harvest/

Breeding has been transformed by science.

Effective insecticide

vaccine and eradication of cattle disease UK major funder of agri research centres. CJIAR including work on biofortification.

Science can’t stay in labs – it must work with business to innovate to help UK and developing countries. New move will contribute to global food security. DFID and FSA are working with developing countries to help.

 

Improved food security stops hunger and brings economic development.

 

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg

 


Bully Breed – a film for Battersea Dogs and Cats home

This project was a new venture for The Refinery, our first opportunity to produce a live action drama. Although it was a nice break from the usual factual, informative stuff, Bully Breed presented a brand new set of challenges, not least of which was working with animals.

The brief from Battersea Dog and Cat’s Home was to produce a short film which would highlight the growing problem of young people illicitly acquiring bull-breed dogs. Seen as ‘status dogs’, these animals are treated aggressively and used as weapons.

A drafted script was produced by Battersea. At its core – essentially a straightforward cautionary tale – the story involves Cale and Shar and the ramifications of their juxtaposed attitudes towards canine companions. After a flurry of re-writes, casting calls, auditions, permission requests, and all the other irksome things you forget have to happen for a movie to get made, we had just 2 days in which to get all the principal photography in the can.

Here are some EXCLUSIVE behind-the-scenes snaps from those exhausting, yet ultimately rewarding, 48 hours…

The dogs were a real joy to work with. In fact, the only significant problem was getting Alfie the Rotty to look even mildly menacing on camera. As you can clearly see from the pictures above he was soppy, mild-mannered, and far too well behaved to portray Omen – Cale’s damaged and bloodthirsty tool for revenge.

Nevertheless, the film eventually came together and was screened to a parliamentary committee last week. They’ve been tasked with tackling this mistreatment of bull-breed dogs and our film was shown to highlight the key issues.

 


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