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Simple measures work….

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

Under nutrition is responsible for HALF of all child deaths and a THIRD of maternal deaths, says Jamie Cooper Hohn of CIF, the Children’s Investment Fund.

gavi_meeting_001_700She says sometimes when we try to help, we try to make an immediate difference, and don’t stop to ask what the real questions are of how best to help.

A well nourished child is 30% more likely to be in the correct grade in school. Stunting does not just affect the physical growth, but also neurological development. This is not just a humanitarian, but an economic reality: A 20-45% increase in wages with a 5-10% increase in physical growth.

Whatsmore, stopping hunger isn’t enough. A child can have as much rice or maize as it needs to feel satisfied, but if that child does not have the correct vitamins and minerals then it will still not develop as it should, physically, or neurologically.

We see ample evidence that simple interventions work – BREASTFEEDIN, VIT A, CALCIUM, IRON, PROMOTING HAND-WASHING AND PREVENTING DIAHORRHEA.

Find out more about CIF here

http://ciff.org/about/

And how they are trying to improve child survival

http://ciff.org/priority-impact-areas/child-survival/

 

 

A PDF of the executive summary can be viewed HERE

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg


Frank and Mwajuma (and some bloke called Dave)

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

A heartfelt personal account of what if feels like to be hungry by young Tanzanian’s Frank and Mwajuma.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 09.29.48

You can see from the picture that Frank is of slight build. He is small for his age (16) and slenderly built.

You don’t get big and strong he says, without good food. Stunted growth is a real thing. It affects many many people the world over.

The “senior cabinet minister” called to the podium is DAVE!

 

PM

Mr Cameron is talking about a 165 MILLION children who by the age of 2 have already been so badly malnourished, that they will never achieve their full expected height or weight.

 

DC says there are 3 questions?

 

1. Does aid really work?

Yes it does – we are seeing the fastest redcution in poverty in history. Child deaths are down by half and 4 million lives saved by vaccination. That’s a resounding YES, but there are still too many dying. We cannot stop here.

2. Why does the UK always have to be out in front when it comes to aid?

Dave says its because of the way the British people are, and how we respond when we hear of disaster and poverty. It says something about our standing in the world. But its not just about our hearts, its our heads too. If we invest in countries before they get broken, we might not end of dealing with the problems afterwards. We are one of few countries who agree to spend 0.7% on development. If we keep doing this we can help 37 MILLION children. Its less than 1 pence a day for us. Its a good investment.

 

3. The problems are never solved, why does it just go on and on?

We have earned the right to say we should do things differently. Different in business, different in science. Harvesting power of enterprise and for science, harnessing the power of innovation – see the sweet potato* that has been engineered to provide Vitamin A.

*more on the sweet potato coming soon!

 

Bye bye Dave!

 

A PDF of the executive summary can be viewed HERE

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg


Unicef’s 1000 days campaign

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

We’ve all just watched Unicef’s moving animation explaining in devastating fashion why the first 1000 days of a child’s life are critical.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZBJTYy2SIk&feature=youtu.be

A critical message here is that breastfed babies in developing countries are more likely to survive.

FROM http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_breastfeeding.html

It was estimated that reaching over 90 per cent of infants with a package of interventions to protect, promote and support optimal infant and young child feeding practices can contribute to reducing overall child mortality by close to one fifth. Optimal breastfeeding practices, especially exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months of age, has the single greatest potential impact on child survival, with the potential to prevent 1.4 million under-5 deaths in the developing world (Lancet 2008). A further 6 per cent or close six hundred thousand under five deaths can be prevented by ensuring optimal complementary feeding (Lancet 2003).

And yet, THIS

BFrates

 

 

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Can science end starvation?

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

On Saturday the 8th June 2013, the government is hosting a “hunger summit”, ahead of a massive family rally in Hyde Park later in the day.

THE BIG IF will feature a host of household names and celebrities and aims to draw attention to world hunger ahead of the G8 summit

“Everyone at the Big IF London rally will help create a huge visual petition to demonstrate the scale of public support for the IF campaign. The petition will be made up of 250,000 spinning flowers, with a total of two million petals representing the two million children who die because of hunger each year – lives that can be saved if world leaders take action at the G8.”

 

Malnutrition hurts people and countries. Today’s event addresses if and how we can use science and business to stop hunger.2010hungry_people

 

 

OTHER BLOG POSTS PUBLISHED DURING THIS EVENT

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg

 

 


Mark Walport – Chief Scientist

This blog is one of several published in real time during the live event “nutrition for growth; beating hunger through business and science”. The rest of the blogs can be found by clicking the links at the bottom of the page. Some of those organisations supporting this movement are include The IF campaignThe ONE campaign DFID

 

Mark Walport speaks:

SCIENCE SECURITY SAFETY

The role of science. Plant and animal diseases are a massive factor in undernutrition.

There is a disease that currently affects 37% of the global wheat harvest/

Breeding has been transformed by science.

Effective insecticide

vaccine and eradication of cattle disease UK major funder of agri research centres. CJIAR including work on biofortification.

Science can’t stay in labs – it must work with business to innovate to help UK and developing countries. New move will contribute to global food security. DFID and FSA are working with developing countries to help.

 

Improved food security stops hunger and brings economic development.

 

 

Why the time to act is now: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lT

 

Mark Walport: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lR

 

Ireland remembers: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lN

 

Malawi: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

It’s not difficult to make a difference: http://wp.me/p3scvU-lK

 

Some bloke called Dave http://wp.me/p3scvU-lr

 

Unicef’s 1000 Days http://wp.me/p3scvU-lm

 

Can science end starvation? http://wp.me/p3scvU-lg